Early Austere Conditions at Wat Nong Pah Pong, Aahn Chah, and more Dhammapada, Buddhism

In the mid 1950s life was austere throughout Northeast Thailand and Wat Nong Pah Pong was no exception

Not in great wealth is there contentment,
nor in sensual pleasure,
gross or refined.
But in the extinction of craving
is joy to be found by a disciple of the Buddha.
v. 186–187

Is what I am doing with my life giving me what I am looking for? We do succeed from time to time
in gratifying our wishes but lasting happiness comes only from being freed of the irritation of
wanting. If we ask ourselves the right questions atthe right time, a radically different view is revealed: the way of contentment draws us inwards, not outwards. Rather than following an impulse to
want more, we can look directly at the wanting itself. And for a moment the sting of craving
ceases. We have learnt a little more about what it means to be a disciple of the Buddha.

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